How does the brain build sensory memory?

November 30, 2020
Scientists have spent decades studying the way the brain translates what it gets from "raw" data from the senses, Litzko says, but what we know so far is still in its infancy. Scientists have spent decades studying the way the brain translates what it gets from "raw" data from the senses, Litzko says, but what we know so far is still in its infancy. Photo source: - Compilation of news visibility from Google

Egyptian news vision: - A scientific team from the Max Planck Institute for Brain Research has succeeded in determining the way in which the brain makes the sensory memory.

According to the study conducted by the scientific team under the supervision of researcher Johannes Letzko, the "cerebral cortex" is the largest area in the human brain, and it is likely that it has expanded and witnessed prominent changes during the evolution of mammalian organisms.

This brain region was able to acquire capabilities that distinguish it from the closest creatures to it, and when any defect occurs in this region, the person suffers from various psychological disorders.

The major cognitive functions in this brain region are stimulated by two separate transfer of information, the first "from the bottom up" and the second "from the top to the bottom."

The first process, that is, "from the bottom up," takes place by carrying information from the environment surrounding the senses to the brain.

As for the second process, ie "from top to bottom", what was obtained is converted and decoded, by placing it in the context of previous experiences.

Thanks to these results, the researcher, Belen Bardy, conducted an experiment on mouse experiments in a laboratory, in an effort to ascertain the sources of these signals that play a role in building sensory memory. The researcher monitored the response in the "thalamus" area of ​​the mouse brain. The results were very clear, and it was found that they are closely related to the issue of memory and its accumulative construction depending on what is being experienced.

Since what has been reached is of great importance, even if it is not very clear, the researchers studied the sources of the signals that are emitted in these two currencies, hoping to know how humans were able to build the sensing memory.

The researcher explained: "What our team or other researchers have revealed is that the upper layer of the neocortex in the brain is the most prominent site for receiving information in the context of a process (from top to bottom), that is, transforming what has arrived from the senses into a feeling, depending on the context and the accumulated experiences precedent".

Based on this information, the researchers were able to identify a region of the brain known as "thalamus", saying it is the most likely source for these internal information processes in the brain.

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