British Navy counters hypersonic missiles with artificial intelligence

June 05, 2021
Mega Shield maneuver gives a glimpse into how to defeat supersonic missiles of the future using artificial intelligence and machine learning. Mega Shield maneuver gives a glimpse into how to defeat supersonic missiles of the future using artificial intelligence and machine learning.

Vision, Dubai United Arab Emirates:- The New Atlas website said that the British Royal Navy succeeded in experimenting with the use of artificial intelligence systems to counteract supersonic missile attacks with live ammunition during the military naval exercises, which were conducted within the framework of the "Great Shield" maneuvers, in which forces from 10 member countries of the alliance participate. NATO with 15 warships, dozens of aircraft and about 3,300 personnel, off the coast of Scotland and Norway.

The British experiment aimed to test the extent to which artificial intelligence systems can quickly detect, track and intercept hypersonic and ballistic missiles compared to human intervention.

Hypersonic missiles are among the most powerful weapons in modern naval arsenals, and because they are able to fly faster than the sound near the sea surface, they are difficult to monitor and detect their trajectories, and the process of intercepting them requires immediate computation and rapid decision-making, allowing to confront and destroy the hostile threat at a distance of up to 1500 meters before reaching its target.

With the emergence of hypersonic weapons, there is a danger that human air defense operators, even with the help of computers, could be forced to indulge in the tasks of analyzing vast amounts of data, identifying the sources of the threat, and then making the right decision to take defensive countermeasures.

The use of artificial intelligence systems in these tasks allows employing the ability to learn from large sets of data and extract patterns from them, enabling them to quickly analyze the massive flow of data provided by increasingly sophisticated sensors, and identify and track missile threats.

According to the British Navy, integrated AI systems allowed human operators to identify live-fire threats more quickly, and helped the warcraft's operations room, which was less burdened, to achieve a distinct advantage.

For the live-fire naval exercises, which lasted three weeks, the Navy deployed three warships: the destroyer HMS Dragon and the frigates HMS Lancaster and HMS Dragon, which, along with crews and military forces, carried experts from the British government's Defense Laboratory Dstl, and industry partners from Roke Companies, CGI and BAE Systems.

Startle systems, which monitor the atmospheric environment from inside the warship's operations room, are used to provide real-time recommendations and alerts, and Sycoiea, which takes results from Startle and helps identify incoming missiles and determine what type of weapon to use to stave off the threat and successfully destroy a hostile target.

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